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Sexing Moa

Researcher: Dr Leon Huynen
Supervisor: Prof. David Lambert

This Marsden funded research is being conducted in conjunction with the Whanganui Museum. The researchers have isolated sex-specific DNA sequences from Kiwi and used them to sex ancient bones of Pachyonis mappini (Moa) which lived on the forest edges in part of the South Island of New Zealand.


Reintroduction of Hihi to Islands

Primary researcher/supervisor: Dr Doug Armstrong

Incorporates 2xMasters; 3xPhD; 1xPostDoc.

Projects which are based on the reintroduction of Hihi from Hauturu (Little Barrier Island) to other island sanctuaries and covers population dynamics and management. Currently a reintroduction project to Mokoia Island, Lake Rotorua is under study. Ngati Wai (Hauturu) as kaitiaki are involved in all activities as well as Te Arawa (Mokoia Island).


Maori Migration

Researcher: Ros Murray-McIntosh
Supervisor: Prof. David Penny

Using DNA sequences, this project gave evidence against New Zealand being accidentally settled by Maori. The work concluded that about 70 Polynesian women formed the founding female population of New Zealand. The results fitted in well with the common understandings of Maori oral tradition.


Human Origin & Dispersal, especially in Oceania (current)

Researcher: Prof. David Penny

The increased availability of DNA sequences from human populations is leading to a better understanding of human origin and dispersal. The availability of the human genome will increase the availability of comparative data. Our current interest is on modeling the ancestral populations of Polynesians and an interesting question posed is: whether there is DNA evidence for Polynesian explorers reaching South America and bringing back kumara.


Characterisations of Helicobacter pylori in a high cancer risk group

Researcher: Dr Paul O'Toole

The increased availability of DNA sequences from human populations is leading to a better understanding of human origin and dispersal. The availability of the human genome will increase the availability of comparative data. Our current interest is on modeling the ancestral populations of Polynesians and an interesting question posed is: whether there is DNA evidence for Polynesian explorers reaching South America and bringing back kumara.


Dairy Farmer Learning & Innovation

Researcher: Tanira Kingi

A three year FRST funded project where to facilitate the establishment/formation of a group of Tararua dairy farmers as a case study.


Dairy Farmer Innovation & Technology Adoption

Researcher: Tanira Kingi

FRST funded project (completed July 2000) which involved the facilitation of the establishment of the Te Arawa Dairy Discussion Group as a case study.


Maori Incorporation & Trusts Use of Farm Consultants

Researcher: Tanira Kingi

MAF funded project. This research involves the surveying of all registered farm consultants and in-depth interviews with 5-6 consultants to determine the constraints to the adoption of consultants by Maori authorities.

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